oppression

All posts tagged oppression

Law

Published August 2, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

Rainbow Legal – Australian Legal Links of interest to LGBTIQ (practical & reform)

GayLawNet – comprehensive resource

Australian Human Rights Commission – Complaints: 1300 656 419

Parliament of Australia – Know & lobby your local Federal member

Australian Law

Australian Government Attorney-General’s Department

Australian Law Online

National Association of Community Legal Centres

NSW Gay and Lesbian Rights Lobby

Department of Justice and Attorney-General

Legal aid Queensland

Women’s Legal Service

Victorian Gay and Lesbian Rights Lobby

Gay and Lesbian Equality (WA) Inc

Darwin Community Legal Services

Australian Coalition for Equality

Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights Group

Take from it what you may and your always welcome to add to the list or ask for the links to be updated

Will there ever be a ‘Post-Racial’ Society?

Published July 27, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

Will America Ever Be A ‘Post-Racial’ Society? | NEWS JUNKIE POST

By Gilbert Mercier

The article gives some commentary on race relations in the US after the arrest of an African American academic Henry Louis Gates in his home by a White police officer. What resulted from this incident were claims of racial profiling and subsequent comments by the President, which caused a political whirlwind.

Points of interest

  • Racial divide did not magically end because of Obama’s election
  • ” racial politics” in America are far from over.
  • African-American & Latino experience, racial profiling by police
  • Minority status makes people automatically potential suspects.

America has come a long way from its ugly past as far as race relations, but we still have a long way to go.

Additional Information

African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968)

International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination

Commentary

In the past 40 – 50 years there have been significant advance in civil rights however the old hate has not disappeared, discrimination has just become more sophisticated. This is but one example of Institutional racism, whereby is

“the collective failure of an organization to provide an appropriate and professional service to people because of their colour, culture or ethnic origin”.

In this case, the police acted on a report that two black men were trying to break into a house, in fact they where however one was the owner of the home Mr Gates.

Further Story by Womenmusing

Black Men and Crime What’s The Story?

Unity Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Published July 21, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

DavidMixner.com – Live From Turkey Hollow

Part One “Oh Lord Not Now!”

Part Two: Learning from History

Part Three: Picking Our Issues

Part Four: What Now?

I will let Mixner’s words speak for themselves, the key points here are the themes he explores and question he asks.  The article speaks to what seems to be human nature that ‘we don’t learn from the past’ and for whatever reason generation after generation seeks to reinvent the square wheel. His target the self-appointed and self-styled ‘New Gay Civil Right Movement’ (US) it seems a network of vanilla mainstream Gay/Lesbian civil rights organisations. When reflecting on historical successes of liberation movements he makes the following point

“People with clearly defined values and principles are the best agents of change. Those who are willing to negotiate or compromise beyond those values and principles often find that they merely face more demands for them to compromise again…. Individuals who know ‘the line in the sand’ and refuse to compromise are often instigators of great change.”

It seems Mixner calls for us to draw a ‘line in the sand’, a position based on our principles that we will not make a compromise on. He reflects on the 200-year campaign by African Americans to gain freedom and some sense of qualified equality. He indentifies the work of Dr King, and attempts to draw some connections between African Americans journey and our own. However, we were there too, campaigning for equality and observance of our civil rights it seems that all those oppressed by the cultural elite demanded equality at that time.

If we are serious about a civil rights movement, we need to start answering a range of questions.

Who are we? The Rainbow Nation or Vanilla wafer

What is the underpinning ideology? Socialism or Liberal Democratic individualism

What are our shared or community vision, values and beliefs?

Where do we come from? rural, regional, suburban or cosmopolitan

When do we start addressing these issues? Strategic or ad hoc

How do we unify such a diverse community? Collaborative or elitist

Why do we need to undertake this task? Aims & objectives? Goal?

Your honour it was the victims fault

Published July 17, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

Discrimination

is the practice of treating people differently on the basis of distinctions made without regard to individual merit. Examples of categories on which social discrimination is seen include race, religion, gender, weight, disability, ethnicity, height, employment circumstances, sexual orientation and age.

Gay panic = Homophobia

HAD = Homosexual Advanced Defence

Homosexual panic

Hate crimesViolence against LGBT people

Heterosexism

Allophilia

Heterophobia

Sissyphobia: Gay Men and Effeminate Behavior

Biphobia Lesbophobia Transphobia Lavender baiting

Michael Savage

Iris Robinson

Matthew Sheppard

How to Get Away with Murder: A Guide to the Gay Panic Defense | jaysays.com |

16 July 2009 Author: jaysays

Nelson Mandela: A Man

Published July 14, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

Nelson Mandela: a man turned into statues in his own lifetime | World news | guardian.co.uk

Madiba is a man who has faced oppression and through his humanity developed resilience that beams from his every word and action. He is no superhero, but an activist who stood up against his oppressors to gain justice, at great personal risk. It is this quality, his resilience that singles him out in history as a great man of principle, a leader who embraced his humanity and showed respect to others that has given him authority. In our community we have many people through their lived experience have gained that quality of inner strength to bounce back or adapt.

In reality we all have that potential however it takes commitment to both principles and action.  It is in the word and deeds that say to our oppressors, that you can marginalise me, oppress me, deny my culture beat me, imprison me and even kill me but I will not be defeated.  I was here yesterday, I am here today and I will be here tomorrow demanding my rights to be treated as a human being.

A Liberal’s Hit List: Poverty in the LGBT Community

Published July 11, 2009 by Michael C Leeson

A Liberal’s Hit List: Poverty in the LGBT Community

The article gives some limited commentary on a recent report by The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law titled

“Poverty in the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community”.

It highlights a number of findings that question the myth of ‘the power of the pink dollar’, in that households in Our Community are at least as likely—and at times more likely—to be poor than married heterosexual couples. The rigour of this claim may need further consideration however the point here is to be mindful that our people come from a diverse socio-economic background.