suicide

All posts tagged suicide

Bullying

Published October 5, 2010 by Michael C Leeson

The recent suicide related deaths of five teens in the US supposedly related to homophobic schoolyard bullying has wiped up a bit of a storm. In no way does this commentary seek to minimalize the human tragedy of suicide and especially that involving children for their family and the community. Rather on these occasions a gaggle of media personalities rush out to tell their story ably aided by mainstream media. Being a cynical old bastard, I tend to take these biographies with a shovel of salt with most of these people having not seen a schoolyard for quite a while. Homophobic bullying affects all children it controls their behaviour to ensure compliance with a limited view of gender identity that needs challenging. Especially, when homophobic bullying does not end at the schoolyard gate, as it is both codified and institutionalised

Do I give a damn YES I DO!

In my three years of secondary schooling, bullies targeted me every day of the week and staff offered no comfort let alone protection.  On some occasions, staff even blamed me for causing the abuse, which still confuses me to this day. I still experience anxiety issues, which often limit my social participation because I do not really trust people. I often hide behind roles, which provides structures that limit the nature of my interactions with others

Does it get better, yes as an adult I discovered my voice, realised,  I have choices and the views of others do not count as much as when I went to school.

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Labor announces Mental Health Policy

Published July 27, 2010 by Michael C Leeson

Upon reflection, the measurers announced sounds great, in acknowledging suicide as a significant mental health issue. The policy outlines a number of suicide prevention measurers underpinned by a primary health care policy framework. However, Labor’s focus on funding for key stakeholders including Lifeline Australia & Beyond Blue seems limited.  The nature of mental illness is complex and demanding, people who suffer chronic conditions readily use up their goodwill with others. Often becoming socially isolated, with family, friends and even professionals rejecting the person because they are so high maintenance in some cases experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation , self harming and suicide attempts. The real issue started with deinstitutionalisation, with a shift in care focus to an undervalued and under resourced community sector. This policy goes somewhat to addressing this issue however it comes down to the quality of front-line services and related resource levels.

How does this policy seek to address these issues?

Links

Lifeline Australia crisis line 13114 (24/7)

Beyond Blue

Mental Illness is not a dirty word